Texas Neighbors Summer 2016 : Page 5

TEXAS NEIGHBORS | SUMMER 2016 A sweet, cool treat By Jessica Domel, News Editor Cool. Crisp. Refreshing. There’s nothing quite like a juicy watermelon on a hot summer day. Fortunately for Texans, there’s plenty of the vibrant fruit to go around. In fact, Texas is one of the top four watermelon pro-ducers in the country. Nearly 600 million pounds of watermelons were grown last year, according to the Texas Watermelon Association. Watermelons in Texas are typically planted in March or early April, depending on weather conditions and location because most farmers want them ready for summer watermelon lovers and the Fourth of July. Watermelons grow on vines and are hand-harvested, which is labor-intensive, especially since the melons contain more than 90 percent water and can be heavy. Texas watermelons come in a variety of shapes, siz-es and even colors. There are more than 100 varieties available! Since a thick, green rind encases the meat of a wa-termelon, many shoppers use the popular “thump” method to help make their decision. “There’s a certain sound. If they’re overripe, it will be like a dead sound. If they’re just right, it’s more like a drum. If you thump it and it doesn’t kind of bounce back at you, it’s probably an overripe melon,” Scott Boening, Wilson County watermelon farmer, said. WWW.TEXASFARMBUREAU.ORG

Texas Watermelon

Jessica Domel

A sweet, cool treat

Cool. Crisp. Refreshing. There’s nothing quite like a juicy watermelon on a hot summer day.

Fortunately for Texans, there’s plenty of the vibrant fruit to go around.

In fact, Texas is one of the top four watermelon producers in the country. Nearly 600 million pounds of watermelons were grown last year, according to the Texas Watermelon Association.

Watermelons in Texas are typically planted in March or early April, depending on weather conditions and location because most farmers want them ready for summer watermelon lovers and the Fourth of July.

Watermelons grow on vines and are hand-harvested, which is labor-intensive, especially since the melons contain more than 90 percent water and can be heavy.

Texas watermelons come in a variety of shapes, sizes and even colors. There are more than 100 varieties available!

Since a thick, green rind encases the meat of a watermelon, many shoppers use the popular “thump” method to help make their decision.

“There’s a certain sound. If they’re overripe, it will be like a dead sound. If they’re just right, it’s more like a drum. If you thump it and it doesn’t kind of bounce back at you, it’s probably an overripe melon,” Scott Boening, Wilson County watermelon farmer, said.

Read the full article at http://texasneighbors.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Texas+Watermelon/2512342/312976/article.html.

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